Treating amputees and those with limb differences.

Are you considering a prosthesis for yourself or your child?

Maybe you haven’t fully decided if a prosthesis is for you. If you haven’t already done so, connecting with a limb loss support group is a place where you can talk to others who can more closely relate to your situation. It is also good to check with your insurance to see what type of device they will cover for your condition. If you have been discussing options with your doctor, ask them for a referral to Collier-Laurence O&P. 

Are you looking to get a second opinion on the fit of your prosthetic device? Call us when you are ready to speak with prosthetic specialist who will listen to your needs.

What to expect when you are getting started.

It is extremely important that a patient expresses their needs and goals – this input has a direct correlation to a successful outcome. Communication between the patient and practitioner is vitally important to formulate your care pIt is extremely important that you express your needs and goals to your prosthetist and your care team. This input has a direct correlation to a more successful outcome. Communication between the patient and practitioner is vitally important to adapt your care plan as your needs change and to help you meet future goals. Physical therapy is necessary to prepare your limb for fit and function of the prosthesis, and there is no way around it, it is hard work. A positive frame of mind will greatly contribute to your successful transition to wearing a prosthesis.

If you are ready to get started, you will need a referral from your primary doctor. At your first appointment, a member of our prosthetics team will conduct a thorough evaluation and listen to your concerns.

Assisting with the transition

We want you to feel comfortable with your prosthesis and be able to take full advantage of its functionality. When adjustments are needed, we make it a priority to respond quickly. Our goal is for you to have consistent and cWe want you to feel comfortable with your prosthesis and be able to take full advantage of its functionality. Education and device training will take a little time. We are always available, and when adjustments are needed, we make it a priority to respond quickly. Our goal is for you to have consistent and continuous care during the life of your prosthesis. We celebrate your achievements and encourage you when you need someone to coach you along.

Do you have a unique limb deficiency?Our lead Prosthetist, George Villarruel, CP, has over 25 years of clinical experience with a heavy focus on congenital limb deficiencies in young patients and their transition to adults. You can read more about his experience on our practitioner page.

Current prosthesis need replacing?

If you have been living with a prosthesis that doesn’t fit quite right, is broken, or causes you pain, you should call your current prosthetist as soon as possible. Prosthetic devices need care and maintenance over time and it is a prosthetists’ job to help you with adjustments. If you do not have a current prosthetist, ask your doctor for a referral to Collier or Laurence.

We are committed to high quality patient care and service.

Patient care and comfort is our #1 priority, and that means communicating clearly and frequently. Prosthetics is a challenging, complicated, and nuanced field, that is why every step of our process is devoted to ensuring the comfort and complete satisfaction of our patients. A member of our prosthetic team will conduct a thorough evaluation and listen to your concerns, and a discussion about your interests, lifestyle and goals is very important. We have bilingual prosthetists and practitioners to make sure everything makes sense to you throughout the process of getting you your prosthetic leg or prosthetic arm.

Comprehensive services with a team of certified prosthetists.

Experienced in all areas of prosthetic care.

  • Our team has the experience to help you through the process of obtaining proper insurance approvals. 
  • Your practitioner works directly with your care team to coordinate services during the treatment phase. 
  • We will be here to provide on-going patient education as you adapt to your device due through physical changes, prosthesis replacements, and upgrades.
  • We treat Veterans, Pediatric Patients and those with Limb Deficiencies

Call us when you are ready to speak with a prosthetic specialist who will listen to your needs.

Medicare and determining your K-Level

A K-level is how Medicare classifies the functional level of an amputee. This is the first step in getting insurance approval for your prosthesis. Your insurance company will need the input of your doctor to fully determine your K-level. This chart (pdf download) is meant to be used to understand the general guidelines used in the detailed and often lengthy insurance approval process. 

Once your K-level is determined and approved by insurance, then we can know which prosthetic components are covered by Medicare.

Learn more about K Levels on the Amputee Coalition website.
If you are interested in some of the research and more technical details about K-Levels, check this page on the International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation website.

K0 – Functional Level 0

The patient does not have the ability or potential to ambulate or transfer safely with or without assistance and a prosthesis does not enhance their quality of life or mobility.

K1 – Functional Level 1

The patient has the ability or potential to use a prosthesis for transfer or ambulation on level surfaces at fixed cadence.

K2 – Functional Level 2

The patient has the ability or potential for ambulation with the ability to traverse low-level environmental barriers such as curbs, stairs or uneven surfaces. Typical of the limited community ambulator.

K3 – Functional Level 3

The patient has the ability or potential for ambulation with variable cadence. Typical of the community ambulator who has the ability to navigate most environmental barriers and may have vocational, therapeutic or exercise activity that demands prosthetic utilisation beyond simple locomotion.

K4 – Functional Level 4

The patient has the ability or potential for prosthetic ambulation that exceeds basic ambulation skills, exhibiting high impact, stress or energy levels. Typical of the prosthetic demands of the child, active adult, or athlete.

K levels are how Medicare bases an individual’s ability or potential to ambulate and navigate their environment. Once your K-level is determined, then we can know which prosthetic components are covered by Medicare.

Learn more about K Levels on the Amputee Coalition website.

If you are interested in some of the research and more technical details about K-Levels, check this page on the International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation website.

If you have questions about your K-level or think you could benefit from a second opinion, please contact us for a consultation.

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